Entries in Skiershop.com (9)

Sunday
Mar302014

Working for the Weekend: Vermont shredding

Here is the latest webisode from Ski The East and Meathead Films featuring Ben Leoni and yours truly. It was a low snow year, but a lot of fun and way better than sitting on the couch. 

 

Wednesday
Mar192014

A few of this season's webisode releases

So, I have been skiing and not keeping up with my blogging, but I though I would post a few of the webisodes that Ski The East has released this year. The first series, "Neo" is Ski The East's webisode series presenting all of the new talent they have acquired in the last few years. With the changing of the guard comes a lot of new energy and great skiing. The second webisode series is "Working for the Weekend," where Ben Leoni and "friends" go out to explore the eastern wilds when he is not working as a lawyer in Portland, ME. I got to participate in this and had an absolute blast skiing slides, chutes and gullies in the Mt. Washington region last year. Hopefully I will get to do it again!

 

Neo: 

 

Working For the Weekend:

 

 

 

Friday
Apr052013

Big stix, cool trix, and getting our snow fix

This winter has been fun and Dana Allen, my husband, has been working hard to capture the essence of adventure in our snowy surroundings. I am lucky to be able to travel with him and I am honored to be a subject in his art. Here is a little taste of what he has been up to. Be sure to check his website out at DanaAllenPhoto.com 

The Winter of 2013 - Ski Adventurin' from Dana Allen on Vimeo.

Tuesday
Apr022013

Cogs and Slogs

There is a common misconception that there are no big ski lines on the east coast. As a Vermonter I know this to be untrue. While the Green Mountains are rolling and treed, the White Mountains next door in New Hampshire have some gnarly peaks with pretty radical descents if you are willing to work a little. This winter I had the pleasure of filming with a group of skiers and Meathead Film athletes who are looking for the Big Mountain experience in New England. We have primarily stayed within the confines of the New Hampshire border, but there has been plenty of powder slaying with a dash of crust and ice thrown in the mix to keep us all on our toes.
While the weather was not always bluebird, we got some good photos and footage, and I got a great workout on the 4-6 mile approaches and the skinner up the Mt. Washington cog railway we tackled every weekend. Needless to say I broke my new ski boots in quickly. I was also surprised that in the past few months, I managed to get out and explore more than I ever did living out west over the course of a winter. There is an inspiration in the community here to experience the outdoors no matter how bad the weather is and no matter how inaccessible the line is. I have learned terms like “shwacky” and “sniggledy wiggledy” which refer to how awful and thick the hobblebush is. I have also trained myself not to close my eyes when I ski through said “shwack.” This has improved my chances of avoiding facial scarring.
All said, the couloirs we skied were aesthetic and Mt. Washington is as majestic as ever. I am excited to see what comes of these days in the Whites and I know there will be plenty more adventuring to come. 
By Louise Lintilhac A.K.A. Steezy Weezie
Wednesday
Mar062013

Rocking Les Chic Choc

This bog post was for the Mammut Team Blog but I thought I would put it up here for everyone to read as well.

 As a Vermonter, Quebec sometimes seems like a bizarre alter ego to the north. We are not sure exactly what goes on up there in the frozen north, but what we do know is that their beer is unbelievably good and they know cheese curd better than anyone else. For these two reasons alone I like to travel in this remote portion of Canada, but I am especially drawn to the Gaspe Peninsula where the mountains rise from the shore of the Saint Lawrence sea way like giant breaching whales. This range, known as the Chic Chocs, is an incongruity in the flat agricultural expanse that makes up the majority of Quebec. They are not spiny peaks, but more rounded like some of their pacific counterparts, the Monashee and Selkirk mountain ranges. Despite this softer geometry, the Chic Chocs provide some serious descents for the interested skier. All the skiing is backcountry, but most approaches are just a few hours and can be accessed directly from the road that cuts through Park National de la Gaspesie. We had set out to ski a new region in the park that just opened to backcountry skiing this year. What we found atop these coastal mountains was a series of open ridge lines, spacious forests, and around 4+ ft. of new fresh snow to shred at will.

In the distance, Mt. Albert reigned over the park, always in our view. We were blessed with an unprecedented number of bluebird days and squeezed every once of ski potential out of each one. Once we were too tired for another lap, we headed back to our Chalet at the Gite du Mont-Albert. We also toured the local town of St. Anne des Monts where we took in the local sites and tried a few regional dishes.

I was not prepared for the quantity of pig product that I got at L'Express, the most popular breakfast joint in town (even the cops were there eating). Skiing was no easy task after putting down bacon, sausage, ham, eggs, potatoes, beans, crepes with maple syrup (not real syrup sadly), toast, fruit, and a piece of something resembling breakfast pate, although I am not sure exactly what it was and I lost steam before getting to that particular item on my plate. I guess I will have to go back and try it next time.
When we packed up the car after the final tour, I was already planning my next trip and lines that I did not get to ski. This Chic will definitely be in the Chocs again soon!!!!!!